reconicicle:

Lençois Maranhenses | ruthvasconcellos
halfwaythruthedark:

Parvarish, 1977

halfwaythruthedark:

Parvarish, 1977


Akira Kurosawa working as an assistant director to Mikio Naruse (right) on his 1937 film Avalanche.

Akira Kurosawa working as an assistant director to Mikio Naruse (right) on his 1937 film Avalanche.


"Glauber Rocha I met over the years, then I started making films—there’s no doubt Antonio das Mortes had a major impact on Mean Streets and on Raging Bull. On Raging Bull we put in some Brazilian music in homage to Glauber, there’s a couple of pieces of music in there. In any event, I think the last time I saw him was in Venice, 1980. But before that, Tom Luddy brought him over—I had a small house in Los Angeles—and we had a dinner. It was Tom Luddy, myself, and Glauber, and I showed him The Big Shave, a short I had made. And we looked at a John Ford film, The Horse Soldiers; not a great John Ford film, but he liked Ford and he liked westerns he told me.”
"[On his favorite of Rocha’s films…] I think it’s Antonio, but I go back and forth. There’s Land in Anguish and Barravento, but Antonio is very much the one I keep checking back with, I keep showing to people—if I think they deserve it. Because sometimes some people are gone, some people are like zombies. They have no more feeling or something, I don’t know, and I think it’s good to show it to people who will… you know it might help them in their work. Even if they reject it, it’s something for them to have a reaction to, rather than what’s being presented today. But, no, I think it’s Antonio, I go back and forth, but the music is always in my head and I know it very well. It’s fresh, it’s new. It doesn’t cater to tastes of the box office, I mean the box office in a bad way, you know, of a traditional, ‘OK, now we’re going to sit you down and tell you a nice story.’ This punches you in the face and wakes you up, it opens your eyes. And that’s what you need today, more than ever.” — Martin Scorsese on Glauber Rocha

"Glauber Rocha I met over the years, then I started making films—there’s no doubt Antonio das Mortes had a major impact on Mean Streets and on Raging Bull. On Raging Bull we put in some Brazilian music in homage to Glauber, there’s a couple of pieces of music in there. In any event, I think the last time I saw him was in Venice, 1980. But before that, Tom Luddy brought him over—I had a small house in Los Angeles—and we had a dinner. It was Tom Luddy, myself, and Glauber, and I showed him The Big Shave, a short I had made. And we looked at a John Ford film, The Horse Soldiers; not a great John Ford film, but he liked Ford and he liked westerns he told me.”

"[On his favorite of Rocha’s films…] I think it’s Antonio, but I go back and forth. There’s Land in Anguish and Barravento, but Antonio is very much the one I keep checking back with, I keep showing to people—if I think they deserve it. Because sometimes some people are gone, some people are like zombies. They have no more feeling or something, I don’t know, and I think it’s good to show it to people who will… you know it might help them in their work. Even if they reject it, it’s something for them to have a reaction to, rather than what’s being presented today. But, no, I think it’s Antonio, I go back and forth, but the music is always in my head and I know it very well. It’s fresh, it’s new. It doesn’t cater to tastes of the box office, I mean the box office in a bad way, you know, of a traditional, ‘OK, now we’re going to sit you down and tell you a nice story.’ This punches you in the face and wakes you up, it opens your eyes. And that’s what you need today, more than ever.” — Martin Scorsese on Glauber Rocha

mizoguchi:

Akira Kurosawa and Martin Scorsese at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival for Kurosawa’s film Dreams.

One day, Martin Scorsese came flying in like a whirlwind. His arms were full of documents, and he rattled on like a machine gun (or so it sounded to those of us who couldn’t understand the language). Not even the veteran interpreter Audie Bock could keep up with him. It turned out he had come by to ask Kurosawa to sign on to a movement to prevent the fading of color film by preserving it in primary colors.
Kurosawa did sign the papers, I believe, but what was most interesting was the strong impression Scorsese evidently made on him that day: Later he asked Scorsese to play the part of Vincent van Gogh in his film Dreams (1990). The image of the two men apparently overlapped in his mind. 
From then on, Kurosawa and Scorsese were like family.

— Teruyo Nogami, Akira Kurosawa’s long-time script supervisor

mizoguchi:

Akira Kurosawa and Martin Scorsese at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival for Kurosawa’s film Dreams.

One day, Martin Scorsese came flying in like a whirlwind. His arms were full of documents, and he rattled on like a machine gun (or so it sounded to those of us who couldn’t understand the language). Not even the veteran interpreter Audie Bock could keep up with him. It turned out he had come by to ask Kurosawa to sign on to a movement to prevent the fading of color film by preserving it in primary colors.

Kurosawa did sign the papers, I believe, but what was most interesting was the strong impression Scorsese evidently made on him that day: Later he asked Scorsese to play the part of Vincent van Gogh in his film Dreams (1990). The image of the two men apparently overlapped in his mind. 

From then on, Kurosawa and Scorsese were like family.

— Teruyo Nogami, Akira Kurosawa’s long-time script supervisor

sisterwolf:

Blue

sisterwolf:

Blue

lensaesthetics:

Gisele Bundchen by Gilles Bensimon for Elle USA (2002)

lensaesthetics:

Gisele Bundchen by Gilles Bensimon for Elle USA (2002)

convolucion:

Y Tu Mamá También (2001) , Alfonso Cuarón

mazzystardust:

Sri Lankan schoolchildren at an aquarium outside Colombo

mazzystardust:

Sri Lankan schoolchildren at an aquarium outside Colombo

mizoguchi:

The Color of Paradise/Rang-e Khodā/ رنگ خدا (Majid Majidi - 1999)